In a couple of days I have to present my master’s thesis, which is on a topic of Information System (IS) implementation in a small organisation.

I conduct a study of critical success factors, but during my research I found that the organisation has deeper problems like readiness, culture and knowledge gaps. Therefore, I think that a study on these aspects would give them more value.

Do you think that I should mention this during my research presentation?

Thanks for your time.

Completely out of curiosity, I was wondering how often PIs have to deal with “bad hires” in their lab/group? I sometimes hear the PI/trainee relationship be compared to marriages, where half ends in a divorce. Is there actual truth to this? There are also posts like these that reinforce this:

Tales of postdocs past: what did I learn?

As profs, have you ever accepted grad students only to regret it later? Does this happen often and how do you deal with it? Are problems typically that they cannot do the work, or that their personality is just not a good fit? I think for the most part PIs I’ve met handle these professionally, but I do wonder how they actually feel about the situation.

How to enhance the speed of ext3 file system in non volatile ram? Since ext3 file system is mainly based on hard disk and updates informations in blockwise, that means if we want to update 1byte of information,it will update whole block which consumes more time. In othehand ext3 in non volatile ram uses byte addressable concept which consumes less time.

I have been assigned to a section of student where I am teaching probabilistic models. From the starting day itself, I feel something strange is happening in the class. For example:

  • I like to have two-way communication inside the class. i.e. I prefer to have some sort of active discussions. However, the students do not respond at all.

  • Given the above point, I initially thought that it was my fault that they are not finding my teaching interesting. But, I sat with them in other courses which they are taking. It is the same. It sounds strange, but, it is.

  • I can’t say they are lazy (c.f. How to deal with lazy students?) because they are doing something else in class. Some are busy coding, some are reading research articles, some are doing something else. Out of 40 students, only ~5 students are interacting.

  • I can’t throw them out of the class, as it is against the university rules.

Due to the above reasons, I (and a few other faculty members) do not feel interested in teaching these students.

How can we improve the class environment, given the passiveness of these students?

I have been assigned to a section of student where I am teaching probabilistic models. From the starting day itself, I feel something strange is happening in the class. To better explain this, please consider reading the following:

  • I like to have two-way communication inside the class. i.e. I prefer to have some sorts of active discussions. However, the students do not respond at all.

  • Consider the above point, I initially thought that it was my fault that they are not finding my teaching interesting. But, I sat with them in other courses which they are taking. It is the same. It sounds strange (and, yes it is.)

  • I can’t say them as lazy (How to deal with lazy students?); because, they are ACTIVE in doing something else inside the class. Some are busy in coding, some are reading research articles, some are doing something else. Out of 40 students, only ~5 students are interacting inside.

  • I can’t throw them out of the class; as it is against the university rules.

Due to the above reasons, I (also few other faculties) do not feel interested in teaching these guys.

How to handle the class given such environment of the inACTIVE students?

Hundreds of students at my institution participate in Alternative Spring Break and Alternative Winter Break each year. Frequently, they create posters of their experiences to share with other students afterward.

This year, we are contemplating assisting group leaders with academic (literature) research related to their respective trips, with an eye toward creation of a more formal paper or poster related to their experiences. This would be presented at our annual student research symposium.

  • Would the students need IRB approval for this?
  • Does it depend on what organizations they’re working with, or what
    kind of information they include in their presentations? That is, if
    it looks more like journalism or self-reflection rather than
    “research” would it be exempt?
  • If the answer is that they definitely
    would need IRB approval in all cases, should they already have been
    getting approval for their less-formal poster presentations?

I’m hoping the answers to these question would also be applicable to students who write about internships and other extra-curricular activities. Also, in case it isn’t clear, I am interested in this from the perspective of advisors and administrators, rather than from that of the student.

Edit: What I’m really interested in is whether it is generally the case that informal “publication” via something like an on-campus, but out-of-class, presentation or an electronic portfolio triggers IRB requirement for things like internship write-ups or class projects that traditionally would be exempt. I’m interested in what other institutions do about this.

Their actual research will just be a review of literature.

(The suggestion to ask our IRB would make sense, except that we’re so small and do so little research as a liberal arts school that we have only had our own board for a few years, and I’m not sure how comfortable they are with cases at the edges.)

I am interested in developing a set of postgraduate level courses that will be taught entirely online aimed at a primarily international (non-UK) audience.

I am seeking strategies for defining a set of learner profiles to help understand broad educational needs to help inform the course design process. While there will be many subject-specific student needs, there will be many more that could be considered generic or trans-discipline.

What strategies are there for defining learner profiles for an online course aimed at international students?

Are there particular parameters I should set eg demographic data, technological ability, experience of higher education etc? These are fairly obvious (although this could be questioned), are there others?

Also, is there an evidence base in support of a given strategy or approach?

Thank you for your time!

EDIT:

A (loose) definition of a ‘learner profile’. Essentially, a generic image of a learner that outlines their needs and characteristics relevant to the learning environment. The expectation is to create a set of broad generalizations about students in order to help inform course design.

This could be informed by research into actual student experiences that are distilled into key questions or criteria, or through professional practice.

This is not to say that the needs of individual learners will be disregarded in a one-size fits all mentality, rather it is to set broad expectations of what learners might need.

Good day, everybody!

I am a 3rd year university student and I have to write a 60 pages report about the transmission of radio waves throughout the environment.

This report should include some analysis about the radio waves, the way they function and some solutions for a better radio waves transmission for the telecommunications companies.

The biggest dilemma I have is about how I should write this paper without being accused of plagiarism. The way I see it, it is not like I can write something about the subject from myself; all that I can write about this has already been written and analysed and the only thing I can do is read some literature regarding the subject and just rephrase or cite the source.

Could you guys offer me some advice regarding this subject and maybe some literature I could read about radio waves and their transmission?

Thank you for your help!

Kind regards,
Chris

I am a new STEM faculty member at a primarily undergraduate institution. I emailed my students (through the school-mandated online course management system) before the beginning of the term about the availability of the syllabus online, as well as other things. Several students told me that they hadn’t checked their emails and didn’t know where to find the syllabus. I have also sent emails to students about their testing accommodations, only to learn that the students hadn’t read my email to them even though it concerned an upcoming quiz.

Would it be inappropriate for me to make a general announcement in class that it is important for students to check their school email accounts frequently, as that is how I plan on communicating with them? I certainly won’t call out any students or mention any specific scenarios that prompted this announcement.