I am asking this in regard to all levels of education, however, I am aware that this forum is primarily for higher education. I would like to know what elements of an answer are indicative of the level of understanding the student has of that question. The sophistication of their language? Length of their answer? Use of meta language? Succinctness?

Thanks in advance!

I am an undergraduate who did research at my university a little while back. It was funded by a non-profit research organization, and I was paid with this money, through the university. I worked alone, but received some advice from people I worked with along the way. At the end of my time with the group, I had a poster with my findings on it, and I was preparing to begin writing a paper on the material. Unfortunately, the head of the group was let go from the university for some some immoral behavior (I’m aware that this is vague, and it intentionally so), and the group was disbanded. The university said that they would try to help me find someone else that I could publish with, but that never happened.

So here I am, sitting on some work that I’m very proud of. I don’t want for it to go to waste, but I don’t know if publishing my findings with a different group, outside of my university, will be considered plagiarizing. Any advice?

Edit: removed a separate question, asking how to bring the research up in applications

I’m a full time employee (20 years), adjunct instructor (10 years), and student (off and on, currently on and about done with a 4-year degree) all at the same institution.

I’ve been programming for 25+ years, and have had an AS (Assoc. of Science) degree in “Systems analysis and programming” for 18 (2-year degree, fewer general education courses than an AA, focused on technical work – nursing, respirator therapy, xray or nuclear med tech, nursing RN, etc.).

Unfortunately, for me to move up or to change jobs I need a bachelors or a masters. So I got a “general sciences” AA degree (to finish off gen eds) and am almost done with a BAS (B. of applied science – LOTS of in-depth technical work).

I also happen to teach at the same college I work full time (support online learning). The courses I’m allowed to teach due to my lack of a masters are limited to classes that ONLY apply to an AS degree – 2 linux admin courses, a intro to SQL course, a intro to Java course.

And while I am 4 classes away from having my BAS, I think the degree isn’t set up properly and I’ve not formally learned any of the things I’d hope to learn. Got plenty of programming – but none of the other skills that go with it. No unit testing, use of version control systems, no working with other peoples code (except for minimal reviewing of others code – no actual passing of code back and forth to work on it), minimal exposure to development methods like Agile, Scrum, etc.

So… do I just shut up and deal with it, and try to find a masters program that will give me what I want (had enough programming, thinking of IT Project Management related things)?

I’ve considered writing a letter to the lead instructors, department adviser, department chair, the various VPs over technical ed at our institution, and the provost (who all know me, like me, and appreciate the things I’ve done for them over the past 20 years), but I’m not sure if making them aware of my disappointment will do anything about fixing the program for future graduates, or if it will just be me whining….

Not exactly sure what tags to use, so I hope I got ’em right – give me a comment if they should change, or feel free to edit.

Edit for the comment about content –

The degree I’m finishing the programming core gave me a 3rd semester of Java (JavaFX and Tomcat web apps), Android development, Angular/NodeJS development, and MongoDB. This is on top of what my AS had me do – 2 terms of Java, C, C++, Access & SQL, HTML/CSS/Javascript, and PHP.

The common overall program core stuff (that the networking track students also do), has had a few business courses (intro to management, principles of e-commerce, security policy), covered some planning – a UML/diagramming class (only exposure to dev methods, and that was just a list of comparisons of waterfall vs up vs agile) and a business dept. based project management class – we got to plan building a bird house :(. Technology wise the common area also includes operating systems and security models, ip networking and routing, and a bits-and-bobs hardware class.

So, plenty of technology and language-specific skill set stuff. But none of those things I’d expected to cover (unit testing, version control, working with a true team, etc) that aren’t language-specific but ARE critical job skills.

So… I’m a full time employee (20 years), adjunct instructor (10 years), and student (off and on, currently on and about done with a 4 year degree) all at the same institution.

I’ve been programming for 25+ years, and have had an AS (Assoc. of Science) degree in “Systems analysis and programming” for 18 (2 year degree, fewer geneds than an AA, focused on technical work – nursing, respirator therapy, xray or nuke med tech, nursing RN, etc ).

Unfortunately, for me to move up or to change jobs I need a bachelors or a masters… So I got a “general sciences” AA degree (to finish off geneds) and am almost done with a BAS (B. of applied science – LOTS of in-depth technical work).

I also happen to teach at the same college I work full time (support online learning). The courses I’m allowed to teach due to my lack of a masters are limited to classes that ONLY apply to an AS degree – 2 linux admin courses, a intro to SQL course, a intro to Java course.

And while I am 4 classes away from having my BAS, I think the degree isn’t set up properly and I’ve not formally learned any of the things I’d hope to learn. Got plenty of programming – but none of the other skills that go with it. No unit testing, use of version control systems, no working with other peoples code (except for minimal reviewing of others code – no actual passing of code back and forth to work on it), minimal exposure to development methods like Agile, Scrum, etc.

So… do I just shut up and deal with it, and try to find a masters program that will give me what I want (had enough programming, thinking of IT Project Management related things)?

I’ve considered writing a letter to the lead instructors, department adviser, department chair, the various VPs over technical ed at our institution, and the provost (who all know me, like me, and appreciate the things I’ve done for them over the past 20 years), but I’m not sure if making them aware of my disappointment will do anything about fixing the program for future graduates, or if it will just be me whining….

Not exactly sure what tags to use, so I hope I got ’em right – give me a comment if they should change, or feel free to edit.

Edit for the comment about content –

The degree I’m finishing the programming core gave me a 3rd semester of Java (JavaFX and Tomcat web apps), Android development, Angular/NodeJS development, and MongoDB. This is on top of what my AS had me do – 2 terms of Java, C, C++, Access & SQL, HTML/CSS/Javascript, and PHP.

The common overall program core stuff (that the networking track students also do), has had a few business courses (intro to management, principles of e-commerce, security policy), covered some planning – a UML/diagramming class (only exposure to dev methods, and that was just a list of comparisons of waterfall vs up vs agile) and a business dept. based project management class – we got to plan building a bird house :(. Technology wise the common area also includes operating systems and security models, ip networking and routing, and a bits-and-bobs hardware class.

So, plenty of technology and language-specific skill set stuff. But none of those things I’d expected to cover (unit testing, version control, working with a true team, etc) that aren’t language-specific but ARE critical job skills.

I am a first year CS undergraduate taking a module on differential equations. For part of this module I did a personal project on the motion of simple harmonic systems (damped and undamped) which I recently found out was in fact something we would briefly cover at the end of the module. From my project I have a very nice set of interactive graphs which I made to aide my learning and understanding of the subject. When I found out that the subject of my project was something that would be covered in the module it occurred to me that this might be worth offering to my professor to possibly share with other students or something to that end. However as soon as I thought this I realised that it might come across as arrogant and I’m now unsure of what to do. Would it be worth emailing my professor about this?

Because of a personal situation, I’m currently unable to attend most lectures (lately none) of a particular math class. However, I have a friend in my section who keeps me updated with the material covered, homework assignments, and exam dates.

I had previously spoken to the professor, explaining that I might be missing sessions throughout the semester, and she seemed understanding; lately, however, I stopped going altogether, and I’ve exclusively shown up for mid-term examinations (on which I do ok). To my surprise, I’ve been able to teach my self quite well, and, given that it saves me a considerable amount of time, I’ve been thinking of adopting this practice in the future.

My question is, given attendance isn’t compulsory, would professors mind this, or develop any kind of resentment toward students who engage in this behavior? I’m a third year undergrad in a public university in Texas.


I’m not really sure whether this question is off-topic for this stack, so I apologize in advance if it is. Please feel free to change the tags as appropriate. Thank you

I have a friend who studies medical sciences, who just finished his general practice studies in another country. Now she is trying to get an admission and come to the US to continue her specialty. I have zero knowledge about medical sciences. How is the admission process? I’ve been told they need to take a few exams and start from first brick? Any information would be appreciated.

While this may appear a quite open-ended question I think it is quite pertinent for a large number of subjects.

Considering undergraduate classes, particularly for students who are coming straight out of school, there is typically an expectation among students that they should not contribute to a class unless specifically asked to do so, that they are there merely to receive information, that academics are “the enemy” who can fail them, and that unless they are trying to curry favour with an academic, or attempting to gain marks that will specifically affect their GPA, that there is no reason to do any work.

This, of course, is entirely counter-productive in university. While it’s clearly not within our power to change the Western schooling system that generates students that are like this, I am interested in what we can do to specifically reduce the “otherness” of academics to students within subjects that we teach: to make them realise that an academic is not an opponent that must be surmounted or avoided.

So when I say “how to reduce the distance between academics and students” I mean the psychological distance. Through this, I hope, that the actual reason for being in university might become more apparent to students, and that it might be conducive to their performing better.

This question is complicated by the fact that certain academics like and encourage this distance to reduce workloads for themselves. Disengaging from students, making it a challenge to be contacted, and maintaining an image of authority are aspects that I have seen deliberately pursued by (generally weaker) academics.