Context: I am an assistant professor of mathematics at a small liberal arts college in the US.

I hold a scheduled office hour every weekday, plus additional hours near exams. Office hours are a significant part of my institution’s culture, and they are regularly used by our students. As such, it is not uncommon for multiple students with entirely different questions to visit at the same time.

I am somewhat unsure about how I should handle this. If they all have the same question, I can easily work with a small group simultaneously on the white board in my office. Otherwise, I can only think of the following options:

  1. Work with students on a first-come, first-serve basis. Move to the second student once finished with the first, then to the third after the second, etc.
  2. Work with students on a first-come, first-serve basis, but only give each student 10-15 minutes before I move to the next one.
  3. Rotate between students, answering a few minutes worth of questions before going to the next student, and eventually circling back.
  4. Tell students that if they want to meet for more than 15 minutes they must make an appointment outside office hours.

Our department has several tables in the hallway, so I usually go with option 3. That said, this method seems inefficient for the students and can be exhausting for me, so I am wondering if I can do any better. Most of my own undergraduate professors used option 1, but I really disliked how a single student could consume nearly all of their time.

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In the United States, if anyone, be it a relative, a colleague, potential employer, or colleague, requests to the pertinent department, in the university I study/ied in, certain information about myself, will they be able to have it?

Is all this information, such as grades, year, internships I applied to, if I live(d) in a fraternity or dorms, etc., under the same regulation; or does each of them have its own set of restrictions regarding disclosure?

Finally, does that still apply to international students and/or people who have already graduated and thus are no longer in the institution? There is indeed the Buckley Amendment (FERPA), but it only covers educational records.

Simply put, if anyone, be it a colleague, relative, potential employer, or colleague, requests to the pertinent department, in the university I study/ied in, certain information about myself, will it be able to have it?

These informations, such as grades, year, internships I applied to, if I live(d) in a fraternity or dorms, etc, are all under the same regulation; or do each of them have their own set of restriction regarding disclosure?

Finally, does that still apply to international students and/or people who have already (under)graduated and thus are no longer in the institution? There is indeed the Buckley Amendment (FERPA), but it only covers educational records.

PS: regarding USA norms

I was recently accepted into a graduate biophysics program and have a couple questions about what I should expect going into my first semester. While I’m going into a physics PhD, I’d like general advice from any field. I have two specific questions, but welcome any advice that you are willing to share.

What is the biggest thing to overcome/accomplish during your first semester and a graduate student? Looking back, what is something you wish you would have done differently?

Suppose, a student left a negative comment about a professor in the university’s confidential review page. Somehow the professor guesses who the student was.

What can the student do if the professor intentionally gives the student bad grades?

Can the student file a request for a exam paper review to the dean?

How would the whole situation work out for the student?

As a final year student (B.Sc.) I wrote a paper, but didn’t keep my supervisor as co-author since he hadn’t contributed at all (in research and paper-writing). I am about to submit my paper to a journal(single-blind peer review).

Does the chance of being accepted a paper to a journal increase if one of the Co-Author is Ph.D./Professor ?

Should one keep his thesis supervisor as co-author for above?

I mean, is there a chance that the reviewer will consider my paper a bit differently/lightly/neglectfully ?

I recently submitted an article to a relatively well-known emerald journal.

After 1 day from the first submission, the status of my article has been shown as “Awaiting for AE recommendation”, and after 5 days, today my status is”Awaiting for AE decision”.

it means reject?

I am teaching a course in a college and assignment homework on a regular basis. Usually I collect all homework in the class and later my student secretary grades all the homework and return them to the students through the mail room. If a student did not turn in the homework at all, a zero will be given.

There is a student who claims to have turned in two homework but got zero for both. I am checking with my secretary and is awaiting for his reply. Likely he will tell me that he does remember anything about her homework. Also I have asked the student to check her mailbox, and it is quite likely that she could not find her homework there.

Another piece of information: I suspect the student is dishonest as sometimes her quiz answer is identical to the student sitting next to her. But since I never caught her red-handed, this should not be used as an evidence.

Now assuming that no evidence can be found regarding whether she turned the homework or not, there are at least three opinions for me:

  1. Give her full marks for the homework, assuming that it is I or my secretary who misplaced them.
  2. Give her zeros, ignoring her claims.
  3. As a happy medium, change her homework status as “excused” so these two particular homework will not be counted toward her grade.

I have done Option 1 in the past, but only to find out later that the student who made the claim turns out to be a very dishonest student and likely she lied to me and benefited from lying. What would you suggest me to do in this situation?

My undergraduate students are going to present their group works to the whole class. I would like that their companions globally and anonymously evaluate them, so that each team can in situ get a grade for their work in this way (besides the evaluation they would get from me as teacher).

My questions are if someone can provide some previous experience about this evaluation strategy (either as a teacher or as a student); and which app or tool could be used for this purpose (i.e. so that the class can vote and we instantly know the points for each team).