I am a university student.I do not know whether I should stay in math major with low GPA?What are the signs indicating the need of a change of major?I seems to be weak in math ability compared with others.In addition, sleep and concentration problem plague me a lot.In the beginning of undergraduate education, I indeed had passion in math.But afterwards, things turn badly.Maybe one reason is lack of sleep and bad habits.I have to travel a long way between college and my home every day.I skip lectures a lot in order to give more time to self-study and doing assignments.Due to this unpleasant undergraduate experience, I sometimes have the thought of dropout.(or waiting to be forced to leave)
Maybe I should take math as an amateur interest?Maybe I should leave the university?If the situation continues like this ,sometimes I think I would end up with being a waiter or cashier struggling to make a living as the employability of math students (especially pure math students with low GPA) seems to be low.What changes should I try to make?

I maintain an email group for my class where the reading list and other course materials are made available to the students. Despite sharing all relevant information with them, I still have students asking me exact page numbers and sections from the book, and whether ‘Topic X or Y will be on the exam’. I am fed up! Am I obliged to entertain these queries? They usually ask these queries on email or typically on sms.

This is a second-year undergraduate class (about 50 students) majoring in economics. I teach them a statistics course. I’ve included a link to the syllabus (page 2 of linked document).

Link to syllabus

My professor (say Mr. X), a theoretical physicist, is in charge of a course on Math Physics in the undergrads. He had co-authored a book on Statistical Mechanics but he never mentioned anything about it to us, since it had no part in that course on Math Physics.

Now, that course was 2 semesters back. And in this semester, I have to study Statistical Mechanics, and this course is conducted by another professor (say Mr. Y). Mr. Y named a few standard books that almost all universities follow (Reif, Greiner, Huang) but not Mr. X’s book (BTW X and Y are not enemies). But I came across X’s book in google books and I liked it very much. But there is no soft copy of the book available on the net.

What I want to know is:

Should I ask Mr. X to give me a soft copy of that book?

The book is not old at all ( published in Dec 2016 ) and well available in the market. I dont know whether it sells good or not, since it was published only 10 months back and very people among my friends and seniors know about this book (although Amazon shows it out of stock). The book is really good and I have a nice relation (as student and teacher) with Mr. X. But there are commercial sides also that he might think, regarding the book.

So will he be offended if I ask him about a soft copy of his book?

In that case, how should I approach him?

So reality is I was academically suspended last school year, my junior year. At that time I was undecided, clinically depressed, and couldn’t leave my bed because I was sleeping 16 hours a day. It was pretty bad. I ended with a cumulative GPA of a 1.6. And damn does that suck. But what this suspension did do, was give me a reason to get my mental health in check. I didn’t want to live like this for the rest of my life. Long story short, I got my shit together and appealed. I am currently in the first semester back and on track to making the dean’s list which is pretty amazing. I’m loving school right now and I could cry tears of happiness. Being back has made me so much more appreciative. I am of getting a chance to continue my education and actually enjoying every minute of it. Problem is with such a bad GPA I can’t declare a major. Which is why, I am also retaking some classes I failed the years before so I will be able to pull mine up enough to get into the major I want. I’m struggling with the fact I am stuck in limbo. I feel like I don’t know what to do. I know what I want to major in, but how will this effect my chances of getting an internship in communications with just serving experience and an as of right now undecided student. For other students who returned to their institution after academic suspension how did you feel. How do you get opportunities when you’re in rebuild. I want to start seeking working experiences and opportunities in my major I plan on declaring after I bring my GPA up. But what do I do know. Can I only just wait?

I have sent the solutions of some assignments to the students of my class.

One of my students sent me a message that reads as follows (not greeting or anything, no closing, just the following):

The proposed solution of Exercise X is obviously wrong because of reason blah blah. An appropriate solution to your exercise would be such and such.

Now, the student in essence is actually correct: there is a slight error (but it does not alter the essence of the solution). It is just a small wording issue that might raise some confusion (but the calculations are clear).

What troubles me is the attitude, which I found kind of offensive (but I might be wrong).

Is it appropriate a student to behave like that? What would be the right approach to deal with this student?

I answered as politely as I could that the student is right, thanked the student for spotting it, and updated the solution manual. But I feel that the student would create similar issues and make similar comments if some typos are found in subsequent notes.

Note: The actual problem might be that the student might start bad-mouthing me to other students/professors and this might negatively influence other students in believing that I am doing a bad job and consequently this could be reflected on my teaching evaluations (given also that I try to get tenured). Maybe I am paranoid (hope so!), but in relatively small classes where everyone knows each other, the power of bad-mouthing can be great. I want a way to (a) avoid confrontation and (b) make it clear that these issues are completely minor (they are) and not worthy of such aggressive (which they might not be, but I do not want to take chances) messages.

I have sent the solutions of some assignments to the students of my class.

One of my students sent me a message that reads as follows (not greeting or anything, no closing, just the following):

The proposed solution of Exercise X is obviously wrong because of reason blah blah. An appropriate solution to your exercise would be such and such.

Now, the student in essence is actually correct: there is a slight error (but it does not alter the essence of the solution). It is just a small wording issue that might raise some confusion (but the calculations are clear).

What troubles me is the attitude, which I found it kind of offensive (but I might be wrong).

Is it appropriate a student to behave like that? What would be the right approach to deal with this student?

I answered as politely as I could that the student is right, thank the student for spotting it, and update the solution manual. But I feel that the student would create same issues in case some typo is found in the subsequent notes and make similar comments.

I am the professor in charge of a first-year course for undergraduates.
Recently, I received an e-mail from a student,
the general meaning of which is the following:

Dear professor,

I am sorry for missing the last few lectures and assignments.
During the last few weeks, I was really sick with the flu.
Could you please help me to get right on track with the class?

How should I respond to this e-mail?
Should I give the student an opportunity
to “make up” the missed assignments,
or should I give the student zeros for the missed assignments?

I come from a university where the first two digits of your student number represents when you started in the university. As such people often use this to judge age, whether the person is repeating or changed course, or is an incoming postgraduate. Student numbers are the identifier for students, and are consequently used in all official capacities, but also in terms of clubs and societies. Attempting to join a club without the right two digits can often be difficult; generally lower digits are a serious social no-no. A student number can never be changed, under any circumstances. If someone starts a course with a hiatus of twenty years, they will still be using their original number. There is also the issue of semi-anonymized information being easy to identify if results are given out using people’s student numbers (if someone doesn’t have the same first two digits as the rest of his peers).

Naturally a unique identifier is a positive thing for managing information. Also having consistency in relation to the manner in which information is recorded is also good. So what sort of action could be performed at the level of the institution to remove this bizarre social stigma, and increase campus social integration, without potentially damaging the integrity in the way in which information is managed (and incurring additional costs of implementation).

I am a PhD student and I have been given the opportunity to teach a course over a three weeks period (2h per day, 30h in total) at an institution overseas. I feel competent in the field of the course I will be teaching, but in practice it will be my first time preparing and delivering a course (which is not the same as doing tutoring, or being a TA).

What strategies can I put in place to be an efficient teacher? In particular, I am afraid not to have enough materials to cover 2 hours of time for each lecture (but then I realize that if I am thinking that, it means I’ll probably be waaayyy too fast, so that’s not good). I am also afraid of being unable to read the classroom, and of losing the students’ interest too quickly.

Of course, I can prepare a lot of material to cover, then just go on my way, see where I end when the two hours are over, and start from there at the next lecture. But this might be too unstructured for the students, and I have very little time between two lectures to reorganize the material, since I am teaching every day for three weeks.

If you can share with me tips from your experience, I’d be very happy.

Context: I am an assistant professor working at a small liberal arts college in the United States.

Like many institutions, mine uses Microsoft Outlook. On occasion, I will receive emails requesting read receipts. Usually these emails are internal (from staff, administration, faculty, etc.) but in this case the email is from a student’s parent.

Am I obligated to accept this parent’s request to send a read receipt for their email? Would it be considered rude to decline it? I certainly won’t ignore their email, but I’d rather not have them know exactly when I read it until I know what it says.

Furthermore, is there a certain expectation around read receipts for internal email? This is probably institution-dependent, but I figured I’d ask anyway.