I refer only to academic PhDs, not doctorates in education. Many swanky fee-paying schools in England and the US hire PhDs as teachers. So what qualities are likely unique to PhDs and may not be mastered (pun intended) by teachers whose highest degree is a Masters?

Charterhouse‘s PhDs in math include:

Dr Graham Kemp, MSc, MMath, PhD
Dr Philip Langman, PhD
Dr Stephen Marshall, MMath, DPhil

Phillips Exeter Academy:

Zuming Feng, “Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University with an emphasis on algebraic number theory and elliptic curves.”
Panama C. Geer, M.S., Ph.D.
Filip Djordjije Sain, PhD Applied Math

St Paul’s Girls’ School (in London):

Damon Vosper Singleton (Head of Department) — MMath (Oxon), PhD
(London)
Pip Bennett BSc, MA (Durham), PhD (Bristol)
Alexandra Randolph MMath (Oxon), PhD (Nottingham), MIMA

Tonbridge:

Head of Department
Dr Ian Jackson

MA (Hons) Mathematics : Trinity Hall, Cambridge
MMath : University of Cambridge
PhD (Radial Basis Function Methods for Multivariable Approximation) : University of Cambridge

Dr Jeremy King
MA (Hons) Mathematics : St. John’s College, Cambridge
PhD (Finite presentability of Lie algebras and pro- groups) : University of Cambridge

Dr Zi Wang
MA (Hons) Mathematics and Statistics: Christ Church, Oxford
MMATH: Christ Church, Oxford
PhD (Sparse multivariate models for pattern detection in high-dimensional biological data): Imperial College London

I’d like to make a career change and go into teaching; for financial reasons (I had to care for my elderly parents, etc.) I’ve been in marketing for 15 years but my true talents lie in writing and teaching.

I’ve taught several seminars and worked as a college tutor and teaching assistant, run many volunteer writing workshops, and have many publications in literary journals, and a new book coming out this June by a reputable publisher. I received my MFA in honors and all of my seminar reviews are extremely positive.

I’m just not sure how to apply when every teaching job posting I find lists “at least two years” of college teaching experience as a prerequisite. At this point I’d even teach a semester free of charge if someone would give me a chance!

I’ve been thinking how I proctor and design exams, and I suspect (from things I hear) that there is much more cheating than I find evidence of. What are the most common ways university students cheat, say in a large lecture math or science class? For instance, some possible ways are:

  • looking at other students exams
  • sneaking in a cheat sheet
  • using a phone/prohibited device in class
  • getting help on a bathroom break
  • having someone else take the exam for you
  • getting a copy of the exam in advance
  • modifying an exam after grading and asking for points back

But I don’t know if any of these happen often enough that I should do more than I currently do.

Ideally, I’d like an answer with data from some studies on cheating, but I’d welcome extensive ancedotal evidence as well.

I read a similar question
(Knowing that most students submit assignments right around the deadline, is it advisable not to set deadline that is very late at night?)
about setting assignment deadlines at different hours of the day
(e.g., 9 AM, noon, 5 PM, 9 PM, midnight).

At my institution,
we use a learning management system
to manage our courses.
I require students to use it
to submit all of the assignments for the course.

I am wondering if it is reasonable to set assignment deadlines on Sunday.

  • On the one hand, I don’t want to ruin the weekend for students
    who may be working on my assignment at the last minute.
  • However, I feel that Sunday deadlines
    have minimal conflicts with students’ other commitments.
    If for example I were to set the deadline on Monday,
    students may skip classes to meet my deadline,
    or they may be busy with work from other classes.

Question:
Is it a reasonable and a good idea to set assignment deadlines on Sunday,
say 6 PM on Sunday?

On a math (let’s say, calculus) exam recently, the students were asked to use the definition of a limit of a sequence to prove that the sequence given by 3n/(3n+5) converges to 1. Given a positive number Ɛ, the definition requires proving the existence of some number N such that if n>N then |3n/(3n+5) – 1|<Ɛ.

As a consequence of the definition, once a sufficiently large N is found, any larger value of N will also suffice. Many students set |3n/(3n+5) – 1|=5/(3n+5)<Ɛ to find N, however, the professor decided to include an extra step: 5/(3n+5) < 5/n <Ɛ, which leads to another sufficient value of N.

Although most students gave a correct proof (consistent with the definition in their book), he took off points because they didn’t find the “best” value of N. The lecturer claims that the author would have used some (unnecessary) inequalities to find the “better” N, which is probably true.

When students complain about losing points, I tell them that their answer is correct and that they should seek full credit for their work. The lecturer suggests that I am “putting the students between him and I” and that he’s ultimately in charge.

Who’s wrong here?

On a math (let’s say, calculus) exam recently, the students were asked to use the definition of a limit of a sequence to prove that the sequence given by 3n/(3n+5) converges to 1. Given a positive number Ɛ, the definition requires proving the existence of some number N such that if n>N then |3n/(3n+5) – 1|<Ɛ.

As a consequence of the definition, once a sufficiently large N is found, any larger value of N will also suffice. Many students set |3n/(3n+5) – 1|=5/(3n+5)<Ɛ to find N, however, the professor decided to include an extra step: 5/(3n+5) < 5/n <Ɛ, which leads to another sufficient value of N.

Although most students gave a correct proof (consistent with the definition in their book), he took off points because they didn’t find the “best” value of N. The lecturer claims that the author would have used some (unnecessary) inequalities to find the “better” N, which is probably true.

When students complain about losing points, I tell them that their answer is correct and that they should seek full credit for their work. The lecturer suggests that I am “putting the students between him and I” and that he’s ultimately in charge.

Who’s wrong here?

Suppose a graduate student is found to be noticeably or even significantly behind in overall academic and research competence. For example, they may have significantly weaker language and comprehension skills and technical skills such as using a computer or navigating the web. They may also be lacking other peripheral skills which are often important for graduate students. This may be indirectly related to being from a minority and/or underprivileged background where such exposure and opportunities to learn can be limited.

The question is, can he/she be held to the same standards as his/her peers when comparing their relative performance? If they are, would this be considered to be discrimination if his situation was known? On one hand, same treatment would be fair to his peers and avoids human judgement. On the other hand, one could argue that it is unreasonable to expect the same amount of performance when they are missing necessary skills and experience.

Edit: There was a comment that ‘held to the same standards’ was too vague. As a result I want to provide some hypothetical situations in which it is necessary to compare the performance of a student with his/her peers.

Suppose an advisor has limited funding for RA and travel opportunities. They want to provide them to students with the best performance either as a means of rewarding them or to provide a better return on investment. This would mean the graduate student in question would have little chance of obtaining it. Is this discrimination or an unfair bias?

Suppose again the average graduation time for a program is 5 years. However, due to the slow progress of the student (compared to their peers) they may be held for 6 or 7 years before being deemed ready to graduate. Is this a discriminatory practice?

It seems that I can’t find any evidence of just teaching positions in universities across Europe, aside from the temporary position for a semester or two. I am mainly interested in Italy, France, Switzterland but let’s make this a bit more broad so it applies to more people.

Every job ad I have seen requests publications and then asks to have a strong research agenda, raise funding, etc.

Do those positions still exists in Biology/Environmental Sciences and related fields? Or perhaps positions with minimal research pressure?

I’m currently an undergraduate student in the US but looking seriously into some master’s programs at European universities for the international experience, cost difference in my field, and exposure to different styles of study. I’d also like to become a high school teacher someday at a public or private school, most probably in the United States.

I understand that each state has license requirements for public school teachers, but as far as where they get their higher degree, would it be disqualifying if the graduate university is outside the US? Does the type of accreditation matter (like if it is accredited in the US, or by the government of the country in which it is located, or another authority)?

For context, the universities I’m looking at are in EU countries and the UK and middle-to-well-ranked.