I have a BS in computer science and an MFA in Fine Art.

I am planning a move to Germany (and am in the process of learning German). Is it possible to find work teaching at art colleges in Germany with an MFA? I currently teach computer science and design/media at a college here in the US.

(I’m assuming I need to be fluent in German, but that might not always be the case because of the increase in international programs?)

If someone could point me to a good informational site that would be great.

Thanks.

When reading submissions by students, for example coding assignments or bachelor theses, I stumble upon code or text not originally written by the students themselves, usually not referenced properly (see the edit below). After being confronted with this, I often hear or read statements like:

I usually tend to see these statements as lame excuses, because I thought it would be common sense how not to plagiarize, but maybe they are right that they really do not know it better. It seems like they think the correct way to avoid plagiarism is to modify the source even more instead of doing it on their own in the first place.

Our usual approach to tackle this problem is to state that we do not want
plagiarism, search for indications of plagiarism and then have endless
discussion about it afterwards.

There are methods to circumvent this partially, for example by providing
individualized tasks
, and our university also provides workshops that teach you for example how a reference list should be built, but I am searching for ideas for the everyday teaching (programming labs, supervising students writing a thesis…) to promote the mindset that taking the text or code from someone else and modifying it is not the correct way, especially when it comes to graded submissions or publications.

EDIT: After receiving multiple comments about what I am worried about is not plagiarism, I would like to explain this aspect a little more by means of some examples:

  • There is no reference at all: This is clearly plagiarism, period.

  • The reference is not sufficient: This is the Wikipedia case from above. Having only “Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/” in the list of references without any indication which part of the text is from which article and which part is written by the student does not help at all and is in my opinion nearly as bad as having no reference at all.

  • There is a proper reference: As others have noted, this is not plagiarism. Still, in the context of grading, we have to look deeper:

    • Written exam: Everyone should agree that a student should fail an exam if he copies the solution by another student even if he writes “This solution was copied from the student sitting next to me.”

    • Code Assignments: I had cases where students wrote “I copied this part from …, because I was not able to do it myself and the rest of the program would not work without it”. This is totally fine for me, but the student should not expect to receive points for the copied part, but only for the other parts written by himself. The same holds for code copied from other sources and modified afterwards.

    • Lengthy text passages: This is the example of copying significant parts of a Wikipedia article, again. But this is already covered in several other questions.

When reading submissions by students, for example coding assignments or bachelor theses, I stumble upon code or text not originally written by the students themselves, usually not referenced properly (see the edit below). After being confronted with this, I often hear or read statements like:

I usually tend to see these statements as lame excuses, because I thought it would be common sense how not to plagiarize, but maybe they are right that they really do not know it better. It seems like they think the correct way to avoid plagiarism is to modify the source even more instead of doing it on their own in the first place.

Our usual approach to tackle this problem is to state that we do not want
plagiarism, search for indications of plagiarism and then have endless
discussion about it afterwards.

There are methods to circumvent this partially, for example by providing
individualized tasks
, and our university also provides workshops that teach you for example how a reference list should be built, but I am searching for ideas for the everyday teaching (programming labs, supervising students writing a thesis…) to promote the mindset that taking the text or code from someone else and modifying it is not the correct way, especially when it comes to graded submissions or publications.

EDIT: After receiving multiple comments about what I am worried about is not plagiarism, I would like to explain this aspect a little more by means of some examples:

  • There is no reference at all: This is clearly plagiarism, period.

  • The reference is not sufficient: This is the Wikipedia case from above. Having only “Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/” in the list of references without any indication which part of the text is from which article and which part is written by the student does not help at all and is in my opinion nearly as bad as having no reference at all.

  • There is a proper reference: As others have noted, this is not plagiarism. Still, in the context of grading, we have to look deeper:

    • Written exam: Everyone should agree that a student should fail an exam if he copies the solution by another student even if he writes “This solution was copied from the student sitting next to me.”

    • Code Assignments: I had cases where students wrote “I copied this part from …, because I was not able to do it myself and the rest of the program would not work without it”. This is totally fine for me, but the student should not expect to receive points for the copied part, but only for the other parts written by himself. The same holds for code copied from other sources and modified afterwards.

    • Lengthy text passages: This is the example of copying significant parts of a Wikipedia article, again. But this is already covered in several other questions.

In the context of plagiarism, I often hear or read statements like:

I usually tend to see these statements as lame excuses, because I thought it would be common sense how not to plagiarize, but maybe they are right that they really do not know it better. It seems like they think the correct way to avoid plagiarism is to modify the source even more instead of doing it on their own in the first place.

Our usual approach to tackle this problem is to state that we do not want
plagiarism, search for indications of plagiarism and then have endless
discussion about it afterwards.

There are methods to circumvent this partially, for example by providing
individualized tasks
, and our university also provides workshops that teach you for example how a reference list should be built, but I am searching for ideas for the everyday teaching (programming labs, supervising students writing a thesis…) to promote the mindset that taking the text or code from someone else and modifying it is not the correct way, especially when it comes to graded submissions or publications.

In the context of plagiarism, I often hear or read statements like:

I usually tend to see these statements as lame excuses, because I thought it would be common sense how not to plagiarize, but maybe they are right that they really do not know it better. It seems like they think the correct way to avoid plagiarism is to modify the source even more instead of doing it on their own in the first place.

Our usual approach to tackle this problem is to state that we do not want
plagiarism, search for indications of plagiarism and then have endless
discussion about it afterwards.

There are methods to circumvent this partially, for example by providing
individualized tasks
, and our university also provides workshops that teach you for example how a reference list should be built, but I am searching for ideas for the everyday teaching (programming labs, supervising students writing a thesis…) to promote the mindset that taking the text or code from someone else and modifying it is not the correct way, especially when it comes to graded submissions or publications.

I teach different courses online and in person and expect all my students to read textbooks and web pages. The online students get an extra explanatory text every week that is meant to replace the content that would be discussed in a lecture or seminar course.

A few students are surprised or disappointed that I haven’t made and posted videos as well. I don’t personally learn well from video content, but it seems some of them prefer, or even expect, to do so. Other than the several that have said as much, I don’t know how many students feel this way.

Scripting, staging, performing, recording, captioning, and publishing quality videos is harder (at least for me) than editing a document. Still, has video instruction become so normative that I should take on this project?

In the (not so distant) past I have received the student evaluations for my course. The evaluation was mediocre, something that surprised me since I thought I had good connection with the students coming to the class (about a third of the total number of enrolled students). These evaluations raised some eyebrows among the relevant committee members.

By accident, chatting recently with a student that really liked and performed very well on the course, I realized that the student did not receive invitation to evaluate the course. I thought it might be an isolated “bug” of the system but I casually mentioned it to a member of the relevant committee. He dug out the system and actually sent me a list of all students that had been invited.

To my shock, 38% of the enrolled students were not invited! What is even more weird is that this missing part included many of the best students (that got 7+) and only one of the students that got 9+ was invited. The “informal” explanation was that because of some mistake (I do not know if it was the system or some person) the students who follow a research track (naturally, the good students) were left out and nobody was actually aware of that. They didn’t seem to care even after I pointed it out.

How can I deal (internally) with this situation appropriately? I have in my record a very mediocre evaluation but it turns out the system made a big mistake leaving out many (good) students. How can I explain this to possible applications where they ask about teaching statement and evaluations?

The main problem is that my department takes evaluations extremely seriously, and my mediocre evaulations had some (admittedly mild, but still…) impact on my development and assessment in the past and might have in the future as well (to some extent, my tenure-track offer depends on that).

In the (not so distance) past I have received the student evaluations for my course. The evaluation was mediocre, something that surprized me since I thought I had good connection with the students coming to the class (about a third of the total number of enrolled students). These evaluations raised some eyebrows in the relevant committee members.

By accident, chatting recently with a student that really liked and performed very well on the course, I realized that the student did not receive invitation to evaluate the course. I thought it might be an isolated “bug” of the system but I casually mentioned it to a member of the relevant committee. He dig out the system and actually sent me a list of all students that have been invited.

To my shock, 38% of the enrolled students were not invited! What is even more weird is that this missing part, included many of the best students (that got 7+) and only one of the students that got 9+. The “informal” explanation was that because of some mistake (I do not know if it the system of some person) the students that they follow a research track (naturally, the good students) were left out and nobody actually was aware of that. They didn’t seem to care even after I pointed it out.

How can I deal (internally) with this situation appropriately? I have in my record a very mediocre evaluation but it turns out the system did a big mistake leaving out many (good) students. How can I explain this to possible applications where they ask about teaching statement and evaluations?

The main problem is that my department takes evaluations extremely seriously, and my mediocre evaulations had some (admittedly mild, but still…) impact on my development and assessment in the past and might have in the future as well (to some extent, my tenure-track offer depends on that)

Regarding to a course for undergraduates (especially in computer science, but i would love to hear opinions from others too):

Is it okay to assign free marks for assignments? Meaning, the students who submitted the assignments will be assigned full marks.

If yes, in total how much percentage of free marks you assign from the overall 100% of the course? Is 30-40% too much?
How many assignments do you give?

This is because, students tend to discuss or copy paste the assignments from friends. And I don’t want them to do that because of fear of losing marks. When I say I don’t deduct marks for a particular exercise, I see that some students are willing to take the challenge and be creative with their answers, although their answers sometimes are wrong. I believe that people learn from mistakes.

But people might question me if I just give them full marks for 30~40% from the overall course marks. I couldn’t measure whether I am too lenient, unbelievable, too dumb, etc, because of lack of experience.

So please, any opinion would be appreciated.