I’m currently deciding whether to take up a tenure-track faculty position. It’s a good position (R1, top-50 department in USNWR ranking), but I’m not very excited about it. In particular, the location is not to my liking. So I would seek to move elsewhere if I took up the position. That is, I would conduct another job search in 2-5 years.

This seems to me to be potentially unwise (as I have been told that it is hard to move between TT positions) and it also seems potentially unethical.

My alternative is to do another postdoc and try the job market again in 2 years or so. That also seems potentially unwise, as I have no idea what the job market will be like then and I may end up with even worse options. I’m also worried that I’ll start to look “old” as a candidate, as I’m already 2 years out of my PhD.

I have talked to a few people. They have given me conflicting advice and they are not particularly able to relate to my situation, so I want to ask for some other perspectives.

My specific questions:

1) Is it unethical to take up a TT position with a desire to leave it? I.e. would it upset people when I end up searching for another job.

2) When evaluating TT candidates, does it look better to have 2 more years of postdoc or a few years as an Assistant Professor?

3) In general, is a second job search usually more/less successful than the first one? What factors might determine this?

I received notification that I wasn’t select for the final round, but they encourage me to apply next time when the application is open.

So I of course, out of curiosity ask when will be the next time.
I got the following reply

Thanks for your reply,

This position is always open.

Best regards,

I m in shock, what this implicate and how should I respond?
Should I immediately resubmit the application? Or ask on how to proceed?
what would you do? What is appropriate to reply? Why would they have always open position? Isn’t that weird?

I received notification that I wasn’t select for the final round, but they encourage me to apply next time when the application is open.

So I of course, out of curiosity ask when will be the next time.
I got the following reply

Thanks for your reply,

This position is always open.

Best regards,

I m in shock, what this implicate and how should I respond?
Should I immediately resubmit the application? Or ask on how to proceed?
what would you do? What is appropriate to reply? Why would they have always open position? Isn’t that weird?

Suppose you are in a tenure-track position in the US and lucky (or successful) enough to eventually get tenured.

The most important effect is obvious that you now have a permanent position. But what other effects are there? Does your salary increase automatically? Does your teaching load change? Do you get (additional) grad students? Are these changes negotiable?

PS: I am outside of the US system but interested in these facts for the purpose of comparison.

I have an assistant-professor position in the US, but for personal reasons, I am moving to Europe. I was offered a tenure-track position in Finland. I don’t know why but I missed to discuss about the startup package during the interview. I asked about it after receiving the job offer, and the dean asked me how much I need.

In the US, I received near $800K for launching my lab and group, but I read that such startup packages are not common in Europe. I do not want to sound unreasonable.

Can you tell me how is the common practice for starting a tenure-track position in Finnish universities?

I have an Assistant Professor position in the US, but for personal reasons, I am moving to Europe. I was offered a tenure-track position in Finland. I don’t know why but I missed to discuss about the startup package during the interview. I asked about it after receiving the job offer, and the Dean asked me how much I need.

In the US, I received near $800K for launching my lab and group, but I read that such startup packages are not common in Europe. I do not want to sound unreasonable.

Can you tell me how is the common practice for starting a tenure-track position in Finnish universities?

I have an R1 offer in Engineering. The department and Dean, per my request, have offered me a very good salary competitive with my competing industry offers, as well as excellent lab space. However, the startup package is lacking. Equipment is 50% what I hoped for, travel budget is 25%, and they fund only one grad student for 2 years. This will slow my lab-building.

As a note, I was asked to apply, but was planning to move to an industry position. The result was an early assurance that a competitive salary offer could be made. The offer just arrived. I have, technically, not yet begun negotiating.

The question: have I spent my capital on this higher salary, or is the salary a reason to think I should be able to negotiate further? Any suggestions on how to approach this in terms of tone/strategy?

Sorry if this question is trivial. It concerns the upcoming job-application season for pure math – something like November of 2018 is when the action starts, I believe (?). I am mostly interested in the USA and Canada, but also information about Australia and Europe will be welcomed.

(1) What are the generic deadlines for the postdoc applications? tenure-track applications?

(2) What are the generic answer dates for the postdoc applications? tenure-track application?

(3) Depending on the answer to (2), I would be glad to hear some information/advice about combinatorics and strategy of applying to both tenure-track and postdoc.

Thanks

I have an R1 offer in Engineering. The department and Dean, per my request, have offered me a very good salary competitive with my competing industry offers, as well as excellent lab space. However, the startup package is lacking. Equipment is 50% what I hoped for, travel budget is 25%, and they fund only one grad student for 2 years. This will slow my lab-building.

As a note, I was asked to apply, but was planning to move to an industry position. The result was an early assurance that a competitive salary offer could be made. The offer just arrived. I have, technically, not yet begun negotiating.

The question: have I spent my capital on this higher salary, or is the salary a reason to think I should be able to negotiate further? Any suggestions on how to approach this in terms of tone/strategy?

I have an R1 offer in Engineering. The department and Dean, per my request, have offered me a very good salary competitive with my competing industry offers, as well as excellent lab space. However, the startup package is lacking. Equipment is 50% what I hoped for, travel budget is 25%, and they fund only one grad student for 2 years. This will slow my lab-building.

As a note, I was asked to apply, but was planning to move to an industry position. The result was an early assurance that a competitive salary offer could be made. The offer just arrived. I have, technically, not yet begun negotiating.

In negotiating, have I spent my capital on this higher salary, or is the salary a reason to think I should be able to negotiate more? Any suggestions on how to approach this in terms of tone/strategy?