I’ve often read that having more than one PhD is badly seen. Is there a good reason for this? Good obviously means with some kind of evidence to back it up beyond plain and simple “personal experience” and opinion.

I’ve seen many comments about this matter, but often rely on a kind of judgment that sounds highly personal and by no means endowed with the academic objectity that I would expect.

I’m making presentation slides, which will be on the work of my Ph.D. advisor (Dr. X, full professor), a postdoc. (Dr. Y, the job title is visiting assistant professor) and myself. I’m trying to find a way to most accurately/politely address them.

Should I address them using the same generic title, such as

“Joint work with Professors X and Y”

“Joint work with Dr. X and Dr. Y”

or should I use different titles?

Thanks

I’ve often read that having more than one PhD is badly seen. Is there a good reason for this? Good obviously means with some kind of evidence to back it up beyond plain and simple “personal experience” and opinion.

I’ve seen many comments about this matter, but often rely on a kind of judgment that sounds highly personal and by no means endowed with the academic objectity that I would expect.

I am looking for US equivalents of Russian academic titles, such as “Kandidat Nauk” and “Doctor Nauk”. I’ve done my research and come up with a list of translations of these terms. I’d like to know which of these translated titles are the most recognized/appropriate in the US academic world and whether they carry the full meaning of the Russian titles.

Кандидат наук – Ph.D./Doctoral Candidate/First Doctoral Degree

Доктор наук – Grand Ph.D./Senior Doctoral Degree/Higher Doctoral Degree/Second Doctoral Degree.

Here are some of the Internet sources I used:

My paper just published online, but I found there might be a problem with the bibtex entry they provided. The title of my paper has an en-dash sign in it, which in latex is -- as I used. However, in the bibtex entry the journal provided for the citation of the paper uses char21{} instead of the en-dash. I tried to see how would it be recognized in JabRef to render the entry, and it turns out to be a wrong character (shown as 21 in the title line).

I have searched on Google, but en-dash should be -- (see here, for example). But char21 is also something pops up on a few other past papers’s bibtex entries from the same journal. In that case, should I contact the journal and ask them to correct it to --, or everything was correct? I know the journal might not use LaTeX but XML or something else for their typeset system.

Thanks!

When a degree is accomplished my University gives you a final official transcript of records and a final certificate for the degree, both containing the title of your thesis. For some reason the internal system of my University does neither allow ndashs nor mdashs on the final transcript of records of an accomplished degree, but it allows them on the final certificate. On the certificate my title will be something like:

title beginning—title end

i.e. it contains an mdash. As the mdash can not be used on the transcript of records I have now been asked, if I would like to have it approximated like “—“, “–“, or “-” on the transcript of records. I dislike all options very much, but tend to go for the single hyphen. I know that wikipedia tells you to approximate it like “–“, or “—“, but is this really the ‘most correct’ way to deal with that on an official document?

Thanks in advance for your opinion!

I’m buying a desk nameplate for a full professor (in USA) who is female and of German origin. I’d like to have this nameplate follow the conventional salutation someone would use in Germany for a female at the highest academic rank.

Please note it is not important if using desk nameplates in Germany are customary or not. But if you’re in Germany and have seen these in academia, I’d be interested in knowing how they’re formatted. This answer is helpful but does not directly address how I should print this on a nameplate.

Assume the individual is called Joan A. Smith, Ph.D.

  • Prof. J. A. Smith, Ph.D.
  • Professor Smith
  • Joan A. Smith, Ph.D. (with “professor” written underneath)
  • etc?

What would be the most appropriate (German) way of engraving this item?

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If I have a BSc in electrical engineering with power specialization but later have an MSc about mobile communications in electrical engineering. What should I call myself as a profession? And which one is more important?

Another example: If I have BSc in mechanical engineering and have MSc in power electronics, what is my profession? Am I a mechanical or electrical engineer?