I am looking for US equivalents of Russian academic titles, such as “Kandidat Nauk” and “Doctor Nauk”. I’ve done my research and come up with a list of translations of these terms. I’d like to know which of these translated titles are the most recognized/appropriate in the US academic world and whether they carry the full meaning of the Russian titles.

Кандидат наук – Ph.D./Doctoral Candidate/First Doctoral Degree

Доктор наук – Grand Ph.D./Senior Doctoral Degree/Higher Doctoral Degree/Second Doctoral Degree.

Here are some of the Internet sources I used:

As how I understand it, as long as the input effort of writing a product (book/thesis/paper) comes from a person, then that one will be the author. No matter how hard their critics or useful their suggestions are, the editors/advisor(s)/reviewers are not co-authors. But once they actually roll up their sleeves to verify the ideas (not just providing ideas), then they should be considered as co-authors, regardless of how small their parts appear in the final works.

Things get complicated in translated works. Since the works are purely about language, giving ideas is verifying them. So technically, anybody who involves in the process should be called as co-translators, even though we can borrow the term “editor” to call people who check the shaped works in later stages of the process. But if the changes made by any of them in whatever stage are sufficiently large to reshape the previous version, then they should be called as co-translators, not editors anymore.

Is my understanding correct? I post it here because this community may have more experience in authorship (or translatorship?). My interest is on theoretical fields, if necessary.

Related: When should a supervisor be an author?
Is someone who solely contributes negative feedback to a paper considered an author?

As how I understand it, as long as the input effort of writing a product (book/thesis/paper) comes from a person, then that one will be the author. No matter how hard their critics or useful their suggestions are, the editors/advisor(s)/reviewers are not co-authors. But once they actually roll up their sleeves to verify the ideas (not just providing ideas), then they should be considered as co-authors, regardless of how small their parts appear in the final works.

Things get complicated in translated works. Since the works are purely about language, giving ideas is verifying them. So technically, anybody who involves in the process should be called as co-translators, even though we can borrow the term “editor” to call people who check the shaped works in later stages of the process. But if the changes made by any of them in whatever stage are sufficiently large to reshape the previous version, then they should be called as co-translators, not editors anymore.

Is my understanding correct? I post it here because this community may have more experience in authorship (or translatorship?). My interest is on theoretical fields, if necessary.

Related: When should a supervisor be an author?
Is someone who solely contributes negative feedback to a paper considered an author?

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Hi there,
I would like to know the specific meaning of “Samuel C. Collins Professor” in the above screenshot. It is a title for MIT faculties or the award with the same name “Samuel C. Collins? Or anything else?

I searched everything I can but still cannot figure it out. Does any one know that?

Thank you in advance…..

The job websites of some US universities ask to upload a doctoral certificate for assistant professor positions in Computer Science. My doctoral certificate is not in English. IMHO, a quick look on it suffices to read my name and “doktor rerum naturalium” to convince oneself that I indeed have a PhD. Still, no website mentions that a certificate should be in English. As a rule of thumb, without asking, should I

  • continue uploading my current foreign-language certificate, or

  • get my certificate translated by a sworn translator, or

  • self-translate my certificate?

I came across two venerable and valuable papers that are not so well-known in their community of interest. One of them is a short technical report, both concern mathematical and physical matters, for what matters. The publications are some 60-year old, and the authors have possibly passed away. These articles are written in no lingua franca. I would be quite inclined to translate them into English and revive their relevance.

My gratification would be to provide as accurate a translation as possible, so I don’t intendedly aim to add anything of my own. Yet, I would like to have these translations published so that the documents are clearly recognisable (a DOI would be nice) and widely accessible. I would also want that my effort is acknowledged, for personal recognition and as a validated item in my track record: a footnote would do.

Were this original research, the natural destination would have been a paper in a scientific journal. But it clearly isn’t.

I have probed the publisher of one of these articles, who have showed the least interest in making any room for a translation, even at zero cost.

I am struggling figuring out a way to achieve these aims. Is there any institution or virtual place hosting/publishing these kind of intellectual products? Any other ideas?

I am not sure about this. In some scenarios, seems like a “Licenciatura/Licenciado” degree is equivalent to a Bachelor’s Degree, or sometimes to a Master’s Degree.

Nevertheless, in some cases “Licenciatura/Licenciado” seems to correspond to a Doctoral Degree. Examples:

The equivalence between a Doctoral Degree and “Licenciatura/Licenciado” seems to be particularly the case when the later “allows to practice the profession“.

A closely related question would be: what is the equivalent degree of PsyD in the Spanish-speaking countries?