Context: Undergraduate computer engineering student in the US looking at attending graduate school in two years. I’m trying to figure out which research topics interest me—hopefully to find one to pursue in graduate school. I’ve only done one semester of research so far and I’m switching out of that lab because I didn’t enjoy it (unhelpful PI and graduate assistants).

Question: Is it seen as disrespectful to be in two different labs at once when trying to figure out a research topic to pursue? If not, should I be aware of any other conflicts when working for two labs?

I’m concerned primary about how this will be viewed by the professors, not the ethics of being in two labs (the research topics are pretty different).

I am supposed to receive research funds from a Chinese university while I am working for a US university. The issue is that the Chinese university, as a part of contractual requirements, requests fund recipients to place the university name before my current university in the affiliation section of my future publications. I understand that it is common to place my current university as the first affiliation and the Chinese university as the second affiliation. Does this affiliation issue matter legally? Or is it just my choice?

I know this is a topic frequently talked about here, but I’m coming from a different point than any of the posts I’ve found so I figured I’d ask.

This post is less of a “can I do it?” question and more of a “what do I have to do to do it?”.

Currently I’m finishing up my 3rd year of high school, but graduating a year early because my school doesn’t have any more courses along my paths of interest (Math, Physics, Comp Sci). While applying for colleges, I decided to go to UTSA because of some meetings I had with a few of the professors there who said they’d be glad to mentor me into mathematics and that there would be plenty of research opportunities (one of the main focus’s of their honors college), and while I know it’s not a top 20 school, I really enjoyed my experience there. I’ll be entering taking Calc 3, Linear Algebra, and a Proofs course because the school wouldn’t let me skip any more than that on my first year before I prove that I can handle it.

Over this last school year I’ve taught myself Calc 1/2/3, Linear Algebra, and basic proofs and set theory. (Apostol Calc 1/2, Spivak Calc, Velleman Proofs, Greub/Werner Linear Algebra) and want to continue self studying (under supervision of a prof hopefully) while taking my courses. If I spent a solid 6-8 hours a day basically everyday working towards progressing so I can take graduate courses as soon as I can, do you think this would be enough to be able to weasel into a good graduate program assuming I have good test scores, GPA, as much research as I’m able to help with, and participating in the campus math clubs.

Basically, I’m wondering how much I have to make up for a lackluster high school career. During middle school I was near the top of the state in UIL and Mathcouts consistently, but my high school did not have any academics math teams so I missed out on all that.

Another possibility would be to transfer to UT Austin after my first year to their mathematics program, but I’m not so sure that would be beneficial.

Ultimately, academia is the dream, so I’m willing to dedicate myself to seeing it happen if it’s possible.

Thank you for your help!

“A”, an independent researcher, has accepted a tenure-track offer* and will be starting in few months from now. “A” also has few manuscripts that are currently under review in high impact journals. Say that 1-2 manuscripts are accepted before “A” joins his/her new institution, will it be ethical/possible for “A” to contact the editors to ask them to delay publishing his/her accepted manuscript(s) to a later issue to when “A” joins his/her new institution? The rationale is that this new work won’t be counted toward his/her tenure if it is to be published before he/she joins the new institution.

*This scenario is for an R1 school in the US.

Please note that “A” has discussed this issue with his/her new Dept. Chair who advised to contact the editors for this manner.

It is said in a variety of sources that the graduate admission committee uses a grading system. For example, if the total score is 10, the adcomm will assign 6 points to research and recommendation, 2 points to GRE, and 2 points to GPA. It is also heard that GPA is only used for the initial screen because different school grades differently.

So my question is, where I can find an example grading scheme? i.e. How much is GPA, GRE, research, and recommendation weighted? I need to know what is the best thing to work on for the grad admission.

I am doing a PhD in the USA. I already have a masters in France and a 5 year bachelor. I didn’t think it was a bad idea to take courses again in the US, as I am changing of area. My acceptance was recomended by an advisor who is paying partially my stipend (I receive 73% of my stipend from my government, who also covers muy tuition and partially the health insurance. The local University (not advisor) completes the health insurance cost). This year taking undergrad courses I haven’t felt very challenged, and in a paper reading and discussion group I have found some professors with a more interesting (for me) approach to things.

Am I stuck with my advisor even if usually students pick a topic after the 1st year? How can I approach this topic with whom? The graduate advisor? My PI is also the chair of the department.

Another thing is that I know some people that do not have funding at all in this department. I wouldn’t want to be stuck in this situation as the rent takes around 2/3 of my income and I have my wife living with me.

I am a master’s student, and I will complete my master’s program soon. During my second year of my MA program, I had to work on a two-semester group project because it was a requirement for the program. My question is the types of critical issues universities care about because universities seem to see issues like academic dishonesty as the most serious offense. Would universities care about the types of incidents that I am about to share below?

I was in a group project of five people, and four of the members were Caucasians (I am a racial minority female). I was treated terribly by two of the members (one female and one male). We had the final paper that was due just yesterday. The male, who was the editor, tends to procrastinate, and he literally waited until the last minute to make significant changes, and demanded from everyone to make the changes. We did this paper in a shared Google Doc by the way. I had another paper that was due at exactly the same date and time, so by the time that he started to become actively involved, I was much more focused on my other paper. He sent everyone an email on the morning of the day just before the due date, demanding significant changes. I was able to look at emails late that night, and he had sent me another email in the evening, asking if I was still involved in the project. By this time, I was already much more focused on my other paper. My response to his email was that I understand that we all have different schedules, and it is possible that we do things at different times. I had worked on the document and made changes a few days before he became actively involved. His response was basically how dare I challenge him, and called me a passive-aggressive person. He even dropped the F-bomb in his response. Now, the other girl. She also had similar tendencies to procrastinate and got along well with this male. On the document, she purposefully deleted my name, and put a comment, “Let’s keep it this way.” My relationships with these two individuals had not been positive throughout the year, but I think this incident went very far.

I never had these kinds of incidents during my four years of undergrad at a different university in the US. I am certain that this type of incident is very rare, especially at the graduate school level. I think that I should share my experience with the school because I think that this is a critical issue.

I am a master’s student, and I will complete my master’s program soon. During my second year of my MA program, I had to work on a two-semester group project because it was a requirement for the program. My question is the types of critical issues universities care about because universities seem to see issues like academic dishonesty as the most serious offense. Would universities care about the types of incidents that I am about to share below?

I was in a group project of five people, and four of the members were Caucasians (I am a racial minority female). I was treated terribly by two of the members (one female and one male). We had the final paper that was due just yesterday. The male, who was the editor, tends to procrastinate, and he literally waited until the last minute to make significant changes, and demanded from everyone to make the changes. We did this paper in a shared Google Doc by the way. I had another paper that was due at exactly the same date and time, so by the time that he started to become actively involved, I was much more focused on my other paper. He sent everyone an email on the morning of the day just before the due date, demanding significant changes. I was able to look at emails late that night, and he had sent me another email in the evening, asking if I was still involved in the project. By this time, I was already much more focused on my other paper. My response to his email was that I understand that we all have different schedules, and it is possible that we do things at different times. I had worked on the document and made changes a few days before he became actively involved. His response was basically how dare I challenge him, and called me a passive-aggressive person. He even dropped the F-bomb in his response. Now, the other girl. She also had similar tendencies to procrastinate and got along well with this male. On the document, she purposefully deleted my name, and put a comment, “Let’s keep it this way.” My relationships with these two individuals had not been positive throughout the year, but I think this incident went very far.

I never had these kinds of incidents during my four years of undergrad at a different university in the US. I am certain that this type of incident is very rare, especially at the graduate school level. I think that I should share my experience with the school because I think that this is a critical issue.