I just realised I referenced a thing wrong in my UG dissertation.

It was some sort of gov/think tank paper, in a a really old and marginal kind of archive, so it was so confusing. There’s literally no way to reference it precisely. I literally spent like hours to dig in the source try find a correct reference and even emailed people to ask. Then I found the seemingly correct one and I just left it. Then I realised its actually a slightly different one: it’s a follow-up of the original report that I actually read through. The year is wrong but the title and the name of the author and publishing info are the same. (That’s why it got me confused in the first place.)

I already submitted my work. How bad would it be? Would one get marked down quite a lot for a wrong reference?

As a young assistant professor in civil engineering, i was tasked with building a new education program that leads to a masters degree in engineering. In order to offer the future students of this program more opportunities, I would like to establish a partnership with a foreign university, to allow the exchange of professors, students, and other types of collaborations that are usually covered in these types of partnerships.

How would you advise me to proceed ?

In the United States, if anyone, be it a relative, a colleague, potential employer, or colleague, requests to the pertinent department, in the university I study/ied in, certain information about myself, will they be able to have it?

Is all this information, such as grades, year, internships I applied to, if I live(d) in a fraternity or dorms, etc., under the same regulation; or does each of them have its own set of restrictions regarding disclosure?

Finally, does that still apply to international students and/or people who have already graduated and thus are no longer in the institution? There is indeed the Buckley Amendment (FERPA), but it only covers educational records.

My prof for my first year anthropology class is new, and I’m having trouble understanding her marking scheme.

Here is the distribution of our class grades:

  • Exam 1: Median 62%, Top 75% got above 47%, while 25% got above 69%

  • Exam 2: Median 58%, Top 75% got above 44%, while 25% got above 70%.

We haven’t gotten our final exam marks back yet, but I was wondering if this is normal for a first year anthropology course?

I’m currently doing university level continuing education in Quebec, Canada. As part of my degree, I want to do some courses from another university online. I’ve talked to my chairperson, and he validated certain courses. So I made an application this January, and recently received a conditional offer of admission.

One of the conditions was receiving the official transcript from my current university. No problem, right? Simply ask my home university to send them the document: they have an online form for it, which I filled out, and off it went.

What I’m concerned about is that under the Documents to send is listed “Official transcript” and under details, “with H18.” What is H18? Does it refer to something that must be on the document, or something about the university?

Screenshot of missing documents

Simply put, if anyone, be it a colleague, relative, potential employer, or colleague, requests to the pertinent department, in the university I study/ied in, certain information about myself, will it be able to have it?

These informations, such as grades, year, internships I applied to, if I live(d) in a fraternity or dorms, etc, are all under the same regulation; or do each of them have their own set of restriction regarding disclosure?

Finally, does that still apply to international students and/or people who have already (under)graduated and thus are no longer in the institution? There is indeed the Buckley Amendment (FERPA), but it only covers educational records.

PS: regarding USA norms

I am studying in private university in Poland. As this is not my first institution, I have a diploma and I have transferred some grades into my current university. But I have a question which does not have an answer in contract.

Do I have to pay for subjects and classes that I have been detached from and do not attend?

I am wondering about this because if I want (or need) to study subject once again for any reasons, I am obliged to extra pay for it.
And the amount of money is very similar to cost per year / number of subjects.

Dean’s Office answered that cost of study is given in contract and it can’t be changed. (But the fact that I pay more for attending additional classes is a case of double standards, ha-ha).

From the point of view of law, is it OK that university doesn’t want to make a discount or refund me cost of subject I do not attend?

after having gotten the bachelors, of course. In the only subject that matters: mathematics.

To satisfy the peanut gallery wanting me to prove Ive done unfruitful research:

I googled “where are my favorite kitties” and I didnt get any answers to grad school strategizing. See for yourself: https://www.google.com/search?q=where+are+my+favorite+kitties

Flipped classroom teaching has become gradually more popular and studies show that the effectiveness of learning is better than in traditional lecture type courses. I’ve tried to give feedback to my own university after courses that this should be pursued, but so far there has been no changes here.

I’d like to know what percentage of courses are using flipped classrooms and how it varies between geographical location and subject/field. I would assume that fields like mathematics and engineering with complex systems to learn would have greater benefits if transitioned to a flipped type since time would be saved on general explanations by students figuring that out on themselves and lectures would concentrate on clarifying questions from the students.

Recently I was offered a PhD position at University X in Switzerland and I accepted it. I had been giving several interviews at several universities and this was the only decent offer I had in months, so I had no option but to accept it, and I liked it as well. Two weeks after accepting the offer and they having started the work visa process, I received a PhD offer from university Y (a much superior university and a great project), also in Switzerland! Now I plan to reject the PhD offer from university X, but the issue is its been three weeks since they started by process for work visa (I am an international candidate). Will my rejecting it at this stage affect my work visa situation at University Y? The offer I have from university Y is amazing and I really don’t want to lose out on it because of legal issues. Can someone kindly advise me on it?