Are there any studies that have compared the number of hours worked by faculty members who are teaching-focused vs. those at research intensive institutions?

I have the impression that faculty that balance teaching and research tend to work longer hours and on weekends more than faculty who do not have any research obligations. I don’t know where I picked this idea up and I’m suspicious that it is biased and based more on opinion than fact.

Any studies/surveys out there to support / refute this idea?

I’m interested mainly in science departments in the USA.

Say I got a Master’s degree in Machine Learning and had 3 years experience as a machine learning engineer and 2 years experience as a software engineer. Would it be possible to do freelance/consulting work during the evening after I’ve already put my most productive hours into research earlier in the morning and afternoon?

How likely is it that my time would be better spent wrangling data/reading papers or that my program wouldn’t allow external work such as this?

How about doing this work over the summer while also doing an internship? I’d like to make a little more than the stipend a year to put in the bank, and I want to work in industry research after my phd.

Although I do research in science as my day job, I spend most of my free time for my life-long hobby, drawing cartoon. But I keep this fact in secret to my research co-workers since the culture of scientific community and that of comics artists are quite different, and I’m tired of looking like a person with an exotic hobby. But recently my ‘career’ as an artist became more successful than I expected (made a contract with a publisher, etc.), I started to worry about my future choices. Would it be wise to pursue two very different careers in my life, researcher and artist?

Many famous comics (e.g. PHD comics, xkcd) from ex-scientists are mostly for the people who are already in the culture of science and maybe it would be OK to be that kind of artist and you could still be accepted in researcher community. However my art style is pretty different from that of other many famous scientist-comics artists. When I draw comics, I try to be like other usual professional artists so that I can draw more attention from the general audience. As a result, my works may contain stimulating elements that would be considered absurd or obscene when read out of context. I’m not saying that my works are particularly unhealthy; comics in general are for fun, and my works are just one of them. It’s just that my works are not very educational. Another concern is time and effort; drawing absorbs lots of time and energy when your art style is not simplistic.

Because of these reasons, I ask for advices from researchers who also have large passion for their asrtistic desire; how do you manage to do both of them? Would being a commercial artist give you disadvantage as a researcher in academia?

I am a master student and soon I will be applying for PhD in the experimental physics career. I always dreamed about being a scientist.

On the other hand I always dreamed about epic journeys. Like hitch-hiking through Syberia or seeing South-East Asia, whilst sleeping in tent, having no schedule, learning local culture, … Such journeys would be few months long.

Is it possible to be a scientist and have such journeys? Eg. two journeys per decade? Or am I just delusional and should make one choice and forget about other?

This may be closed or marked duplicate with “How old is too old for a PhD”. I’m finishing my bachelor’s at 24 this year after enrolling 6 years prior, and have interesting goals — though I’m worried about the time. I already feel as if I’ve lost a few years not pushing myself to the max of my creativity.

I guess a lot has to do with what extracurriculars make me feel fulfilled, as I can always volunteer for research and try to file patents (I haven’t focused on this much yet). I just want to feel like I’m doing more than the minimum to get great grades in my classes.

Onto the question: Is a PhD something I should start earlier or later? If I start later, by say 37 at the latest, how much would my ability to publish a ground breaking result suffer? And would it be a disservice to myself if I had the potential to publish such a result earlier in life?

I need to support myself after my bachelor’s, so if I plan to go my current route of Machine Learning Master’s –> ~ Neuoscience PhD, I’ll need to hold 5-10 years (excluding Master’s) in industry before starting my PhD. Maybe I’d be happiest just keeping myself intellectually fulfilled until I start my PhD?

Edit: The funding portion of my question was associated with a Master’s degree. I’ve done a lot of reading on PhD funding. I’m also asking what the benefit of getting a Master’s before a PhD is, in regards to finding a job in Industry after getting a PhD. I’m also asking, if I want to be interdisciplinary, do I need to get a Master’s with thesis in one field so I can focus solely on my PhD…or could I avoid becoming a master of none if I tried to combine sophisticated machine learning with neuroscience after immediately starting a PhD? Isn’t that too much to learn in a few years?

I am a PhD student. I am feeling something unusual in my PhD: to me it appears that my supervisor ignores my correct answers and always gives me a feedback when my answer is wrong. I know this is a good thing, but problem is due to this kind of his behaviour I always feel demotivated and my confidence has gone very much low. These days I try not to give many answers I fear being wrong, which gives the (incorrect) impression that I am less curious about research. To me it looks like that in academia people will not highlight positive things about you, but they will highlight negative things about you.

Quesion : How to deal with this constant negative feedback in academia as a PhD student?

I am a PhD student. I am feeling something unusual in my PhD, to me it appears that my supervisor ignores my correct answers and always gives me a feedback when my answer is wrong. I know this is a good thing, but problem is due to this kind of his behaviour I always feel demotivated and my confidence has gone very much low. These days i don’t try to give much answer because of the fear that it may be wrong which means I am less curious about research ( although internally I am very much ). To me it looks like that in academia people will not highlight postive things about you but they will highlight negative things about you.

Quesion : How to deal with ignorance in academia as a PhD student?

One simple solution is don’t pay attention to these things but it is not working for me.

I am currently a PhD student working out research and also doing mathematics for my PhD research. Most of the time these days I spend on studying — maybe 15 to 16 hours per day. I believe that I joined the PhD as an active student, but now I am not as active as I used to be in the initial years. My productivity is less these days as I try to avoid mistakes in my research. I have started feeling nervous in front of my colleague as I don’t have any publications until now.

I always try to prepare my best but these days fail quite frequently and make silly mistakes which are annoying. Sometimes I even forget the basic definitions. Looking at myself during my initial two years I find myself a fool these days. I think this is called the rigorous phase of PhD where your ideas have to pass rigorous mathematical proofs and I am quite independent these days.

Question: How to get through the rigorous phase of PhD?

I know that academic institutions are somewhat distanced from the affects of economically hard times but I wanted to ask some questions:

  • Did it have any effect at all on your rent, money spent on food or money spent on social life (if you had time for it)?
  • Did it change the perspective of your career’s future?
  • Did it benefit you if you graduated during the beginning of recovery?

Thanks!

How do you plan your day? How much time in a day do you spend studying/ reading/ doing actual research? Do you work on weekends?

update: I would be more interested in experiences of researches with a Social Science/ Humanities background. I often feel that I do not spend enough time on studying (I am a Masters’ student), and also I am thinking about getting a PhD, so I just want to know how much time a professional researcher spends doing actual research.