According to the Nature article, “LGBTQ scientists are still left out
These some, so called, heteronormative assumptions in this field. Which is in mine opinion not correct if I use my own experience and anecdotal evidence.
By appearance (it is subjective feeling, therefore maybe wrong) people in STEM tend to be more feminine than any other profession. Again maybe I’m wrong, but I would like to see the peer review study (gender study or social science) explaing this problem.
According to Opinion by Manil Suri published in the New York Times. In science is also not appropriate to talk about hobbies.

Being too expressive of personal identity can be viewed as running counter to scientific neutrality. In competitive venues, where complete immersion in one’s field might be the promoted ideal, the mention of an extracurricular pursuit can even be seized upon as a lack of commitment. I remember a young mathematician at a prestigious research institute sharing his love for piano playing after hearing I wrote fiction. “Don’t tell anyone in my department I own a piano,” he requested in the next breath.

this is such a shock to me because I perceived STEM field as most openminded.
I would like to see the peer review study regarding such a possition as described in Nature and NewYourk Times.

I am currently working in the sciences (broadly speaking, the STEM field) in the United States as a researcher.

I have been following quite closely to the social-political trend of the US for the past few years, and I am quite troubled at the direction that the administration, as well as a (seemingly) majority of the society, is taking us. I am troubled at the US administration’s policy of travel ban, which has affected dozens of my actual colleagues. I am resentful of the lack of empathy of many Americans when it comes to police abuse and political corruption. Overall, I am not optimistic about the increasingly intolerant atmosphere against many racial minorities in the country. They are my colleagues, mentors, friends, family, and peers.

At the same time, I am also troubled by the use of technology to limit people’s privacy and to influence people’s opinion for the worse. A recent presentation at my University was on the topic of accelerating content ranking algorithms that can be used to influence social networks. I have read about how this automated algorithms can be used to isolate people into an echo chamber and cause extremist views. The presenter had no qualm about the ethical implications of these engineering decisions.

While there is a strong tendency in the STEM fields to ignore the social and the political, perhaps out of fear that it will distract from our work, I know that these things will not be ignoring us. I have read about the consequence of the rise of fascism in Germany, and its steep cost to academic research. I have read many stories of famed researchers becoming refugees, or being sent to concentration camps, or even committing suicide. I fear that this future may seem as far off from us now as it was to the researchers in the early 20th century.

How can I practically contribute to social justice (and human rights in general) while working in the sciences? Scientific research is very meaningful, but it requires a lot of focus and concentration. I understand that a scientific training has potentially stripped me of being educated on many social issues, and I can make up for it by reading about them. However, it there anything more I can do beyond this? Can I use my skills as a scientist to meaningfully contribute to research that can have a meaningful impact on social justice? Has anyone else found a coping mechanism?

Please I need your help!

I am a guy who has almost finished high school IT address.
Many teachers have advised me to continue my studies at university.

I am very much inclined also to the humanities and literature
moreover also as a musician… and I am very fought in making a choice that could change my life.

The problem I do not know how to solve is the following:

  • Which address should I take, and how I know if it is suitable for me?
  • How do I choose a university?
  • What is the most useful address in the world of WORK today?

And if there is someone intensely interested in helping me,
Which university have you chosen, and how have you prepared for it?


But if you do not know how to answer, you are asken (if you like the question or my sincere problem) to put an upvote, which will help me to find more evidence and receive more views thus increasing the likelihood of responses that will give the right path to my life!


PS: I have no problem if the university is not in my country! pleazz

I’m a computer scientist at the point in my postdoc where I will have to decide soon whether to apply for faculty positions this fall or go to industry, in the US/Canada/UK/maybe Europe.1

But I’ve also recently come to the realization that spending half of my waking hours fervently wishing I had been born a girl could be a sign that maybe I should be doing something about that.

My situation is such that I doubt I would be able to really “pass” anytime soon, if ever. Even if I went all-out on transition immediately – which I’m not sure I’m ready for anyway – I can’t imagine that I wouldn’t be quite obviously physically trans at interview time and at least for a while afterwards.

I’d be fine presenting male through the faculty interview process and so on; my dysphoria is not particularly acute, and I have not yet started on hormones or anything. But I am certainly not willing to wait until tenure! I’m old enough already. (~30, but losing hair fast….)

Transition will obviously make life harder either in industry or in academia. But assistant professorships are not like normal jobs. Getting students, perhaps getting grants, perhaps teaching, and probably a million other things will all be harder in the midst of transition. It would also be combining two quite stressful experiences at the same time, and early-stage assistant professorships are not necessarily the most friendly job to the possibility of required medical absences / etc.

By contrast, my assumption is that a job as a researcher at some tech company will only provide the “usual” amount of discrimination and inconvenience, with probably better capability to handle potential medical issues, much more financial support for a potentially expensive process, and maybe fewer people I’ll need to convince I’m a real person. A greater portion of these jobs are also going to be available in a major liberal city with the support structure for this process (and near my existing social networks for support).

And yet, ideally I think I’d want to be on the faculty market anyway.

So: how infeasible is transitioning as an early-career faculty member? Should I abandon this path for now and go to industry research instead, and maybe come back to it after a few years?

I’d particularly love to hear from anyone who’s been in a similar situation, or to be pointed to examples of academic scientists who’ve transitioned before being well-established in their careers.

(This seems to be the only relevant question on the site, but is broader, and the examples of trans academics there seem to have all transitioned after already being quite established [except Lynn Conway, who (a) did this in the 60s/70s and (b) had to completely restart her career in “stealth mode”]. There are also a few on workplace about related situations for “normal” jobs, but I’m looking for academia-specific thoughts.)


1 I don’t really want to do another postdoc; I’m in the second year of my current one, with a professor who’s relatively prominent in my subfield, and though it’s been great I can’t help but think that a second one almost anywhere else would be seen as a “step down.” Doing multiple postdocs is also quite rare, though not unheard of, in my area. My current position is “term-limited” before another faculty cycle comes around.

I’m confused on whether I should continue my study as a master student or not?
I’m currently just graduate as an ICT student.

If I’m going to continue my studies, what are the bad and good in taking a master?

I heard there are coursework and research for taking Master, but are there any different? Isn’t both of them are about making research papers?

I have recently (one year ago) started work in academia as an assistant professor or a lecturer in NZ system. We don’t have tenure track system which is great. I was wondering how long does it take one to get used to academia. I will clarify my question.

I really enjoy research and working with the research students. Also, I have secured a large research grant. However, I never considered teaching as a career. Having said that, I would enjoy teaching if I had an opportunity to design my own course. Currently I have to teach courses which are given to me. I found that teaching takes up lots of time and my research outcomes plummeted as I have no consistent free chunck with no interruptions. Not sure how to cope with exhaustion of having to give a lecture.

Any suggestions how to balance research and find enjoyment in teaching?

I have recently ( one year ago) started work in academia as an assistant professor or a lecturer in NZ system. We don’t have tenure track system which is great. I was wondering how long does it take one to get used to academia. I will clarify my question. I really enjoy research and working with the research students. Also, I have secured a large research grant. However, I never considered teaching as a career. Having said that, I would enjoy teaching if I had an opportunity to design my own course. Currently I have to teach courses which are given to me. I found that teaching takes up lots of time and my research outcomes plummeted as I have no consistent free chunck with no interruptions. Not sure how to cope with exhaustion of having to give a lecture. Any suggestions how to balance research and find enjoyment in teaching?

I am a PhD student who works in theory of abstract mathematics. I have been patient but nowadays I am losing my temper, patience, etc. Many publications have been rejected as well as my proposals for grants. I have submitted one research paper which was recently rejected also.

I am working very hard but also feeling disheartened about the way academia works. As a student it is very hard to be patient. I worry each time my proposal get rejected or even if I have a failure in my research. I am trying my best to be patient but I don’t know how to keep it.

Question: How much patience is needed while working on a PhD? (in terms of number of years for a publication) Is there any way to not worry about the failures we have in academia?