As a part of my research project, I am almost finished a first paper. I was proud of myself because of the contributions: I was able to take some ideas that has been used in the field for some years now, and I provided a unified point of view. However, as it turned out, some of those results had been already obtained before. Nevertheless, this results seems to be unknown yet in the community of the field.

A very important conference is coming up, in which the main leaders on the topic will be present. My supervisor wants me to give a talk about my results in this event. Given the fact that a few of these results had been already obtained (and of course, I am not taking credit for this), the paper with only my contributions (discarding what was done before) is not a strong paper. Although my supervisor thinks it is OK, I am afraid that giving this talk in front of these experts will result in them not taking me seriously as a researcher in the future. What are your thoughts on that?

I am sorry for naivety.

I found a workshop that fits my research and I want to submit a paper to the workshop. The problem is that the location of the workshop is far away from my hometown and I don’t have funding to cover the travel expenses.

Do you think it is obligatory to visit the workshop (conference) and to give a talk in case the paper is accepted?

Earlier this year my paper was rejected for conference A with 3 highly rejects, so I tried to revise it and then submitted it to conference B. This time I still got rejected with 1 weak accept and 2 rejects. However the program committee has just told me that my paper can be a candidate for one of the conjunct workshops and if I agree they will forward my paper to the workshop for review.

The thing is the deadline for conference A next year has just been extended so me and my advisor are considering resubmitting the paper to it. I have already been revising the paper before conference B contacted me. My first submission to conference A got really bad (but very helpful) reviews. This time the reviews are more positive as their main concern is only about experiments and evaluation that need to be more thorough. They hardly have problems with my design, which used to have a lot of flaws pointed out by the first review. So should I try the workshop with probably higher chance to get accepted, or should I bet my 2nd chance with conference A? By the reviews I know that my paper is getting better, but since it’s already the 2nd rejection, I am not so confident that I can make it…

The Max Planck Institute for Mathematics at the University of Bonn hosts workshops such as ‘Young Women in Harmonic Analysis’, ‘Young Women in Geometry’ and ‘Young Women in Mathematical Physics’ biannually, I think.

I am very interested in attending such a workshop as they are seldom found within the topics I am interested in. However, the title of the workshop begins with “Young Women”. Moreover, the description on their page states that “the workshop provides a platform for female graduate students and postdocs in mathematical physics…”

Now, before you lambast me for even considering it, note that they also write “everybody is welcome to attend the workshop. We encourage all participants – male and female”.

My worry is that male participants are technically permitted so that they do not break any discrimination laws and that if I were to attend such a workshop, I may find myself in the awkward situation of being the only male there facing the scowling looks of my female contemporaries.

Thus, my question is: can I apply (from a common sense, ethical, moral, situational point of view…because technically, I obviously can)?

The Max Planck Institute for Mathematics at the University of Bonn hosts workshops such as ‘Young Women in Harmonic Analysis’, ‘Young Women in Geometry’ and ‘Young Women in Mathematical Physics’ biannually, I think.

I am very interested in attending such a workshop as they are seldom found within the topics I am interested in. However, the title of the workshop begins with “Young Women”. Moreover, the description on their page states that “the workshop provides a platform for female graduate students and postdocs in mathematical physics…”

Now, before you lambast me for even considering it, note that they also write “everybody is welcome to attend the workshop. We encourage all participants – male and female”.

My worry is that male participants are technically permitted so that they do not break any discrimination laws and that if I were to attend such a workshop, I may find myself in the awkward situation of being the only male there facing the scowling looks of my female contemporaries.

Thus, my question is: can I apply (from a common sense, ethical, moral, situational point of view…because technically, I obviously can)?

I’m surprised I couldn’t find any similar question. Please mark as duplicate if you know one.

What are the practical aspects one should not overlook when organizing a (small) workshop?

Organizing a small (~ less than 50 participants, on one day) workshop includes taking care of a lot of small details that I feel are easy to forget, and yet crucial (easy Wifi access, parking spots, break room, collecting information during registration, etc.)

What is your “to-do” list when you’re in charge of organizing a gathering of that kind? What are the nice finishing touches (having work room available, creating a web forum for the attendees, etc.)?

I am attending my first ever workshop next week, in Theoretical Computer Science. My goal is plain – discuss interesting ideas to find new problems to work on and collaborators to work with. My advisor is very supportive of this, as he says one must always try to work on problems independently (or at least with other students/non-professors) on the side.

While I’m very excited at the prospect of something good panning out of this, I’m also very nervous for the following reasons: 1) I have zero publications. Our current work is not completely written up yet. 2) I also am slow in understanding things, so I tend to ask lots of questions in talks otherwise can’t get anything out of them and quickly get lost.

I am worried that these two characteristics will make me appear very undesirable as a collaborator.

I am also not totally clear on how I can steer a conversation with someone (say during a coffee break) to “Do you have any problems you are interested in that I could also work on?”. Obviously this is 100% selfish, but it’s really my only interest in being at the workshop.

Any advice is much appreciated!

I recently participated in a conference. Several workshops were organized in parallel with the conference, and I also took part in one workshop to see what kind of material is presented there.

To me, there was no major difference between the conference paper presentations and the workshop paper presentations. Both usually discuss work that is in progress, i.e. could benefit from some new ideas. I didn’t see a huge quality difference between workshop paper presentations and conference paper presentations. Both conference papers and workshop papers presented interesting ideas that usually had some merit.

My understanding is that the workshop papers are also peer-reviewed and additionally will be published in conference proceedings. So no difference here, either. Also, in both cases, questions and occasionally even some criticism were raised by the audience.

So, what is the difference in practice between workshop papers and conference papers?

Related question, not exactly the same: What is the point in publishing a paper in a workshop rather than in a conference?

In during the M.Sc., when complex networks course lectured by prof. in university, he said me that I will talk about complex networks and my B.Sc. thesis in one session for students.

How to can I write it in my CV? What is it? a lecture? presentation? or workshop?

It was a lecture of Introduction to Complex Networks in the Complex Networks course for master of science (M.SC.) students. Also, I lectured about the Graph, R, and iGraph package in R programming language.